Office of the Inspector General

Mission

The Inspector General serves as an Extension of the Eyes, Ears, Voice and Conscience of The Adjutant General; focusing on the Readiness, Economy, Efficiency, Discipline, Training and Morale of California’s Military Department.
 
IGs receive and process requests for assistance, complaints, or allegations from National Guard Soldiers, Airmen, Family members, Federal employees, Retirees, Veterans, Congressmen, Private citizens from any source (including anonymous) regarding operations, organizations, functions, and personnel issues.

 

IGs research regulatory guidance to identify issues, allegations, and IG appropriateness. Complaints will be handled through assistance, inspections, and investigations or teaching and training when appropriate.

 

Any military or civilian member may file an IG complaint. However, many Department of the Army civilian complaints (e.g., discrimination, sexual harassment, and conditions of employment) must be addressed by agencies other than the IG (see Complaints not Appropriate). Anyone, including civilians with no military affiliation, may file Fraud, Waste, and Abuse disclosures. Depending on the circumstances, the IG may also accept complaints from dependents or relatives of National Guard members, active duty members and retirees and their dependents. However, it’s always best for the actual “complainant” or person who witnessed the alleged wrongdoing to file the complaint. If you have a concern and are unsure if you should file a complaint, contact your local IG office for guidance.

 

The following types of complaints are appropriate for the IG System:

 

  1.   Pay IDT, AT Pay, Duty Without Orders
  2.   Personnel Actions Promotions, Discharges, Retirements, Orders, Delinquent OERs/NCOERs, Weight Control, Physical Fitness Testing
  3.   Medical LOD, INCAP Pay, Active Duty Medical Extension, Medical Separation Boards
  4.   Command Management, Family Care Plans, Sensing Sessions, Whistle Blower Reprisal, Command Climate, Undue Command Influence,     Preferential Treatment
  5.   Personal Conduct, Non-Support, Fraternization, TDY Fraud, GSA Vehicle Usage, Living at Armories

 

  • A violation of law, policy, procedures, or regulations (including laws or regulations prohibiting sexual harassment, unlawful discrimination, reprisal, and improper mental health evaluations)

 

  • An injustice or abuse of authority

 

  • Inappropriate conduct/misconduct

 

  • A deficiency or like condition

 

Promptly report any of the above complaints through the appropriate grievance channels, including your chain of command, and the IG if necessary. The subject of your complaint must be involving a National Guard program or person. Bear in mind, however, the fact that you may disagree with your supervisor(s) over management styles or have what you believe is a “personality conflict” does not constitute an injustice or mismanagement. If you are not sure your concern is a reportable matter, contact your local IG office for guidance.

 

Army Guard: Soldiers must submit complaints to an IG within one year of learning of the alleged problem or wrongdoing, or within three years since the date of the problem or wrongdoing. National Guard Bureau-Army and Department of the Army IGs may accept complaints submitted three to five years after the alleged problem or wrongdoing when extraordinary circumstances justify the complainant’s delay in reporting the allegation or issue—or in cases of special Army interest. Any complaint over five years old requires the approval of The Inspector General of the Army.

 

Air Guard: Airmen must submit complaints to an IG within one year of learning of the alleged problem or wrongdoing. IGs may accept and refer complaints that exceed the above time requirements if the complaint is of special Air Force interest, or the complainant is able to demonstrate that he/she was unable to meet the time standards due to unforeseen or extraordinary circumstances, and such circumstances justify the delay. Complainants must submit IG complaints within one year of learning of the alleged wrong. IG complaints not reported within one year will normally be dismissed unless the complainant is able to demonstrate he/she was unable to meet the time requirements due to unforeseen or extraordinary circumstances and such circumstances justify the delay. IG complaints not reported within one year may seriously impede the gathering of evidence and testimony.

 

All military and civilian members have a duty to promptly report gross mismanagement; a violation of law, policy, procedures, or regulations; an injustice; abuse of authority, inappropriate conduct, or misconduct; and a deficiency or like condition, to an appropriate supervisor or commander, to an IG or other appropriate inspector, or through an established grievance channel. Complainants should attempt to resolve issues and personal complaints at the lowest level possible using command channels before addressing them to a higher level or to the IG. The immediate supervisory command chain can often resolve complaints more quickly and effectively than a higher level not familiar with the situation. The IG system should be used when referral to the command chain would be futile or there is fear of reprisal. The IG may dismiss a complaint if, given the nature of the alleged wrong and the passage of time, there is reasonable probability that insufficient information can be gathered to make a determination, and/or no special California National Guard interest exist to justify investigating the matter. IGs may also dismiss a complaint if there is no recognizable wrong or violation of law, regulation, or policy.

 

You may submit your complaint to any IG at any level including the Inspector General, Department of Defense (IG, DoD). However, AR 20-1, and AFI 90-301 , encourages service members to resolve complaints at the lowest level. Therefore, a good “rule of thumb” is to determine the lowest level commander (e.g., company/battalion commander, Numbered Air Force commander, or Major Command commander) who can “fix” the problem and submit your complaint to that commander’s IG. If you believe that commander is part of the problem, then submit your complaint to the IG of the next higher commander. You should generally start by submitting your complaint to your local Installation IG, who can provide guidance and determine if your complaint needs to be “elevated” to a higher level IG or placed in a different grievance channel.

 

The IG does not generally handle matters that have established grievance channels, appeal channels, or methods of redress. If a policy directive or instruction provides a specific means of appeal or redress of a grievance, you must exhaust those appeal procedures before submitting a complaint to an IG. Further, you must be able to allege that the process was mishandled or handled prejudicially before an IG will process a complaint of mishandling. Mere dissatisfaction with the outcome of an appeal is not sufficient basis for an IG investigation.

How To Contact The Inspector General

 

For Army Inspector General assistance, complete a DA Form 1559. For Air Force Inspector General, complete an AF 102. Mail or bring it to the Inspector General Office. If you do not have access to this form, any legibly handwritten or typed letter is acceptable. Please include your complete mailing address and daytime telephone number so we may contact you for clarification. In Addition, be sure to state the specific action you are requesting and include the following:

  1.   The details as to what occurred to better inform us of what happened.
  2.   Who you have contacted to try and resolve the issue (example: name of person in chain-of-command, name of supervisor, etc.).
  3.   Copies of any documentation pertaining to the complaint.

 

Mail To:

 

Departments of the Army and the Air Force

Joint Force Headquarters

ATTN: CAAG-IG (BOX 8)

9800 Goethe Road – P.O. Box 269101

Sacramento, California 95826

 

Phone Numbers:

 

Commercial: (916) 854-3580 or (800) 200-3580

FAX: (916) 854-3597

DSN: 466-3580

EMAIL: ng.ca.caarng.list.inspector-general@mail.mil

 

40th Infantry Division:

Email: ng.ca.caarng.list.40th-id-ig@mail.mil

FOIA- Army

The Inspector General closely controls IG records. This tight control is necessary because the unauthorized use or release of IG records can seriously compromise the IG’s effectiveness as a trusted adviser to the commander.  All IG records are the property of the Secretary of the Army, who has delegated release authority to The Inspector General of the Army (TIG).  With the exception of inspection records, local IGs may not release IG records, even for official uses. Inspectors General are authorized to release limited information concerning potential allegations, witnesses, and evidence to follow-on Department of the Army investigators without first seeking approval from the DAIG Records Release Office.

Army Regulation 20-1, Inspector General Activities and Procedures, chapter 3 Inspector General Records, paragraph 3-4, Request for IG records states:  “Request for IG records must be in writing and submitted for action to the Records Release Office, HDQA (ATTN: SAIG-ZXR), 2511 Jefferson Davis Highway, Arlington, VA 22202-3912.”

FOIA- Air National Guard

The Inspector General closely controls IG records.  This tight control is necessary because the unauthorized use or release of IG records can seriously compromise the IG’s effectiveness as a trusted advisor to the commander.  All IG records are the property of the Air Force, who has delegated release authority to The Inspector General of the Air Force.  Local IGs may not release IG records, even for official uses.

Air Force Instruction 90-301, section 4c, paragraph 4.12.1 states: “SAF/IG is the initial approval/denial authority for all IG records request under DODR 5400.7/AF Suplement, The DoD Freedom of Information Act and the approval/denial authority for IG records requested under AFI 33-332, Privacy Act Program.”